Charles Darrow Monopoly

Valuable Vintage Board Games – Part 1

Those of us in the storage auction business see board games in storage lockers all the time. They seem to be a staple of abandoned units, just like artificial Christmas trees. Unlike artificial Christmas trees, vintage board games can be precious and highly desirable. According to Research and Markets, The World’s Largest Market Research Store, the world board games market will grow to 10% by 2024. This estimated growth equates to $12 Billion in revenue.

Do you know how to determine if a board game is valuable and how you should resell them? There are many, many things to look for to determine the value of a board game. See some tips below to see if you can get top dollar for your vintage board game finds.

Rarity

How challenging is the game to find?  How many copies did the publisher release? Board games dated back to pre-historic times and were handmade and painted. A complete set of a pre-historic game would be invaluable.  Games produced in the late 1800s and early 1900s were often made of wood and paper. The ones available are very pricey.

Because a game is old does not mean it is rare or valuable. Parker Brothers produced thousands of monopoly games in the 1950s and 1960.  Likely, the only old versions of Monopoly that would be valuable would be first editions or first copies. New games can also be valuable. Limited edition games produce in the last ten years are valuable.

Condition

Board games, like most things, will likely fetch more money if they are in good condition. It is often hard to find board games that have not been opened or played with, but these games would sell at a premium.  Collectors like to display the box as part of their collection, so a game box in good condition is more valuable.

Does the game have all the pieces? Collectors usually look for a complete set of the game. Simple missing pieces are easy to find or replicate. Intricately designed missing pieces, specialized pieces will lower the value. If you do find an incomplete board game, there is a market for selling the parts by themselves to others looking to complete a set.

There are a few key terms collectors use when talking about the condition of a board game.

  • OOP – Out of Print
  • P/UP – Punched or Unpunched
  • Mint or Mint in Sealed Box (MISB)
  • NRFB

Graphics, Lithography, and Illustrations

Details are key. Collectors consider box covers a work of art. Games with more intricate details and vivid colors are more likely to be valuable. For instance, games made before 1860 are often hand-colored and considered extremely rare and valuable. Different styles of design are also important, such as Art Deco or Futurism. Collectors looking for the artistic element of valuable vintage board games often care less if the game is good or fun to play.

Genre

Specific genres of games are more valuable. Namely, the following examples.

  • War Games
  • Miniature Games
  • Games depicting personalities or cartoon characters
  • Sports Games
  • Movies
  • TV Shows

Have you had had a big win with a vintage board game? Head over to our Facebook [link ttps://www.facebook.com/storagetreasures] page and tell us all about it. Revisit our blog next month for part two of this series, which will feature specific games and why they are so valuable.

Have you found what you think might be a valuable vintage board game? Check out BoardGameGeek.com or TheBigGameHunter.com to learn more about your game.

Do you hope to find a valuable vintage board game? Head over to StorageTreasures and see if you get lucky!

Are you new to storage auctions or thinking about bidding on a storage auction? Find out HERE What Happens After You Win a Storage Auction.

Featured image source: The Saturday Evening Post sourced from, The Strong National Museum of Play, Rochester, New York.

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